Resources

How does one find good therapists, psychiatrists, or school counselors? What books should I read about bipolar disorder? What are some good informational websites? And what do all these strange psychiatric terms mean?

Despite the greater access to information about mental health available on the web, many persons with bipolar disorder and their family members cannot find needed services. This is because all of this information is in different places. In this section, we bring together much of the information you’ll need to learn to cope with bipolar disorder in yourself or a loved one. To start, we offer a “Glossary of Terms” that provides definitions of the more difficult concepts you’ll run across.

Author: Massachusetts General Hospital School Psychiatry Program  

A printable or downloadable article.

WebMD offers excellent general information about bipolar disorder and is easy to search and navigate.

Type: Web Sites   Category: Adult Patients
Author: Mark Williams, Danny Penman  

The book is based on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). MBCT revolves around a straightforward form of mindfulness meditation which takes just a few minutes a day for the full benefits to be revealed.

Type: Books
Author: Zindel V. Segal, J. Mark G. Williams  

From Guilford Press:

This bestselling work, now in a new edition, has introduced tens of thousands of clinicians to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression (MBCT), an eight-week program with proven effectiveness. Step by step, the authors explain the "whys" and "how-tos" of conducting mindfulness practices and cognitive interventions that have been shown to bolster recovery from depression and prevent relapse.

Type: Books   Category: Adult Patients, Clinicians

"Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP) is a division of the American Psychological Association (APA). Its mission is to encourage the development and advancement of clinical child and adolescent psychology through integration of its scientific and professional aspects. The division promotes scientific inquiry, training, professional practice, and public policy in clinical child and adolescent psychology as a means of improving the welfare and mental health of children, youth, and families.

Author: Cinda Johnson, EdD  

A downloadable pdf from the Balanced Mind Foundation web site, this is a guide for helping high school students to set goals for after graduation.

From http://www.transitionyear.org/parent/about.php?id=2

The Jed Foundation, a national nonprofit working to promote emotional health among college students, has partnered with the American Psychiatric Foundation to launch the Transition Year, an online resource center that helps students and their families focus on emotional health before, during and after the college transition.

Author: Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law  

Federal Programs to Assist Transition-Age Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions
SKU CY-8
Size 166 pages

Moving On is a collection of fact sheets on 56 programs, run by 20 or more different agencies in nine departments of the federal government. Each offers information about the program’s purpose, services and funded activities, the administering federal agency, grantee and beneficiary eligibility, and a brief assessment of the program’s impact.

Available in print or by pdf download

“The National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs (NATSAP) was created in January of 1999 to serve as a national resource for programs and professionals assisting young people beleaguered by emotional and behavioral difficulties. The Association is governed by an elected, volunteer Board of Directors comprised of representatives from the NATSAP membership.”

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