Resources

How does one find good therapists, psychiatrists, or school counselors? What books should I read about bipolar disorder? What are some good informational websites? And what do all these strange psychiatric terms mean?

Despite the greater access to information about mental health available on the web, many persons with bipolar disorder and their family members cannot find needed services. This is because all of this information is in different places. In this section, we bring together much of the information you’ll need to learn to cope with bipolar disorder in yourself or a loved one. To start, we offer a “Glossary of Terms” that provides definitions of the more difficult concepts you’ll run across.

HOPE SAYS...

I Hate Myself: Hope says You Are Loved
I Don't Matter: Hope says You Have A Purpose
I Don't Fit In: Hope says You Belong
I Want To Give Up: Hope says You Have A Choice
I Feel Useless: Hope says You Are Needed

Hope says We Can't Imagine Life Without You!

A message from David J. Miklowitz, PhD — Professor of Psychiatry, UCLA Semel Institute

This is a video with Dr. David Miklowitz talking about the role of faith communities for the mental health community.

Author: David J. Miklowitz, Michael J. Gitlin  

This much-needed volume gives clinicians essential strategies for managing the complexities of bipolar disorder and tailoring treatment to each patient's changing needs. Highly readable, accessible, and pragmatic, the book provides expert guidance on critically important treatment questions. It addresses which medications to try and at what dosages, what psychosocial interventions are most helpful at different phases of the illness, how to continually monitor and fine-tune treatment to keep patients functioning well, and how to involve family members productively.

Hosted by the UCLA Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital Board of Advisors, “The Perils of Adolescence,” the inaugural Community Conversations, was a sold out event. The symposium showcased distinguished UCLA Faculty elucidating common teen behaviors to enhance important understanding in parents and educators. As adolescence is a time when mental symptoms often emerge, early recognition and treatment are critical for healthy outcomes.

Author: Miklowitz, D. J., Semple, R. J., Hauser, M., Elkun, D., Weintraub, M. J., & Dimidjian, S. (2015)  

This study examined rates of mood improvement in 39 women who were perinatal (pregnant, postpartum, or planning pregnancy) and who had a lifetime history of major depression or bipolar disorder. The women participated in an 8-week course of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), a group treatment focused on meditation practices. Participants with major depressive disorder (n = 27) reported improvements in depression from before to after the 8-week treatment, with no further mood deterioration by 6 months.

School Mental Health, a site developed by the Baltimore School Mental Health Technical Assistance and Training Initiative, covers a wide range of topics from the perspective of educators.

Author: American Psychological Association  

In Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder, Dr. David J. Miklowitz demonstrates a family-oriented approach to working with young clients with this diagnosis.

Type: Video   Category: Clinicians
Author: Psych Central Staff  

The mental health social network Psych Central provides a two-page article on Women and Bipolar Disorder.

Author: Hilary Smith  

Insightful, clever and funny autobiography on the 20-something experience of being bipolar.

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